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Thursday, December 3

  1. page Tale of Two Cities edited In ​In this space, First of all, don't forget that this novel is like a big jigsaw puzzle. {ji…
    In​In this space,
    First of all, don't forget that this novel is like a big jigsaw puzzle.
    {jigsaw-puzzle-in_hands.jpg}
    ...
    Friday
    Nov. 16
    Nov. 17
    Page 28
    Nov. 18
    Page 50
    Nov. 19
    Page 79
    Nov. 20
    104
    Nov. 23
    read
    Nov. 24
    read
    Nov. 25
    read
    Nov. 26 Happy Thanksgiving.
    read
    Nov. 27
    read
    Nov. 30
    Page 247
    Dec. 1
    Page 269
    Dec. 2
    Dec. 3
    Page 292
    Dec. 3
    Page 311
    Dec.
    4
    338

    311

    Dec. 7
    FINISH! p. 338
    Dec. 8
    p. 351
    Dec. 9
    FINISH!
    Dec. 10
    Dec. 11
    (view changes)
    5:47 am

Thursday, November 26

  1. msg ReaderMania to p. 247 message posted ReaderMania to p. 247 If you didn't already hate Stryver, you really should now. Give yourself a point if you find him p…
    ReaderMania to p. 247
    If you didn't already hate Stryver, you really should now. Give yourself a point if you find him putrid.

    And another point if you caught that Gabelle is now in prison, for no crime of his own.

    And another point if you wanted to yell, "NO, Darnay, DON'T GO TO FRANCE!!!!! THEY WILL KILL YOU THERE, YOU FOOL!!!"

    See how you have to have conflict to make a good story? If Darnay stayed put with his happy family, that's the end of the interest. But instead we see him leap into the darkness and we know he's in for it.

    2 possible R.M. points
    7:04 am
  2. msg Charles receives a letter to p. 247 message posted Charles receives a letter to p. 247 Monseigneur now means all the nobles of France. Dickens personifies them all as if they were one p…
    Charles receives a letter to p. 247
    Monseigneur now means all the nobles of France. Dickens personifies them all as if they were one person, as he does when he personifies Saint Antoine, the neighborhood, as if it were a single person. The nobles are fleeing France as fast as they can. Those who are lucky enough to make it to England often hang around at Tellson's, looking for news. Things are a MESS in France: you can hardly get in or out. Mr. Lorry figures he's going to have to go to straighten out some affairs of his clients. This is a dangerous journey, but not too bad for Mr. Lorry because he is English and can't be to blame for any of the injustices the people are now extracting so much blood for.

    Darnay goes to see Mr. Lorry and it turns out there is a letter addressed to him! This is his old name, the Marquis St. Evremond, the title he renounced and wanted nothing to do with when his uncle died. He has never participated in the oppression of the people, but here comes a letter to him. He promised Dr. Manette never to tell anyone his name, so nobody knew where to send the letter. Stryver is also there and says some nasty things about the current marquis, implying that he is a traitor to his class and probably is just as bloodthirsty as the rebels. So unfair, untrue, and like Stryver!

    Anyway, Darnay opens the letter and finds it is from Gabelle, who is in a bad way. Oh, Darnay, don't do it! But he does. He decides to do something really, really dumb. Oh aaaargh.
    7:02 am
  3. msg ReaderMania to p. 235 message posted ReaderMania to p. 235 You knew there were now 2 Lucies, a mother and a daughter. You picked up the puzzle piece of M. …
    ReaderMania to p. 235
    You knew there were now 2 Lucies, a mother and a daughter.

    You picked up the puzzle piece of M. Defarge searching Dr. Manette's cell in the Bastille.

    You noted the appearance of a new friend for Mme. Defarge, whom we call The Vengeance.

    You remembered Gabelle and filed him away as another puzzle piece.

    You have not forgotten who the marquis is now. When the Marquis was killed by Gaspard, who was his heir?

    4 possible points.
    6:52 am
  4. msg Storms gather, fires burn to p. 235 message posted Storms gather, fires burn to p. 235 Six happy years pass for Lucie and Charles, who now have a little girl, also named Lucie, although …
    Storms gather, fires burn to p. 235
    Six happy years pass for Lucie and Charles, who now have a little girl, also named Lucie, although their son dies in childhood. Sydney Carton drops by from time to time and Lucie knows that he is a better man than he lets on. Mr. Stryver condescends to bring his three sons to be tutored by Darnay, but he refuses. Stryver is very pompous and annoying and makes it out that Lucie tried to "catch" him into marriage but he eluded her wiles. What a jerk.

    Meanwhile, things are heating up in France. They storm the Bastille and free the prisoners (only seven of them) and kill the guards-- Mme. Defarge takes a particularly active role in this. M. Defarge forces one of the guards to take him to 105 North Tower, the cell where Dr. Manette was imprisoned, where he searches the cell. The mob also gets ahold of Foulon and kills him brutally: their vengeance has awakened. In fact, Mme. Defarge has a new friend, a woman they call The Vengeance.

    Then we go to the chateau where the Marquis, Charles's uncle, had lived and died. The people there have risen up, too-- and one of the "Jacques" sets fire to the chateau. M. Gabelle, an overseer who has tried to make things better for the people, is powerless to stop them or to save the estate. He locks himself into his house and climbs up the roof, figuring that if the mob breaks in, he will fling himself off the roof and kill a couple of them before they can seize him and kill him as they did Foulon. He is innocent, but he knows they don't know or care: they just want blood.

    We just really hope that these angry footsteps are not the ones Lucie hears echoing around their house in SoHo!
    6:49 am
  5. msg ReaderMania to p. 207 message posted ReaderMania to p. 207 You remembered that on page 138, when Charles first asked Dr. Manette if he had his permission to s…
    ReaderMania to p. 207
    You remembered that on page 138, when Charles first asked Dr. Manette if he had his permission to seek Lucie's hand in marriage, Charles wanted to tell Dr. Manette something, but the doctor absolutely refuses to hear it. He tells Charles that if his suit prospers and Lucie accepts him, he can tell him on his wedding day. What was that secret?!!

    This ReaderMania question is worth TEN POINTS!
    6:14 am
  6. msg Goin' to the chapel to p. 207 message posted Goin' to the chapel to p. 207 There is a touching scene of Lucie and Dr. Manette sitting out under the plane tree (we call them s…
    Goin' to the chapel to p. 207
    There is a touching scene of Lucie and Dr. Manette sitting out under the plane tree (we call them sycamores)the evening before she is to be married and Dr. M. speaks of his long captivity for the first time. Lucy worries that he will worried or troubled when she goes away with Charles for the honeymoon and goes in to see him while he's sleeping. Then the wedding day comes. Miss Pross is very happy for Lucie, except she does wish the bridegroom could have been her long lost brother, Solomon.

    On p. 195, Charles and Dr. Manette come out of a private conference and the doctor is terribly pale, but composed. The young couple is married and off they go, and then: calamity. The doctor has resumed his shoemaking and seems not to know who or where he is. This goes on for nine days and nights, but then he comes to his senses as if nothing had happened. He and Mr. Lorry talk about it, pretending it is a friend and not the doctor to make it easier to discuss, and the doctor assures Mr. Lorry that it probably won't happen again and he had dreaded it, but feels the worst is over. The two men agree to get rid of the shoemaker's bench and tools, but the doctor is very reluctant about this and is not at home when it happens. Lucie never knows about the relapse of her father.
    6:11 am

Tuesday, November 24

  1. msg Back to St. Antoine to p. 188 message posted Back to St. Antoine to p. 188 Okay, back to Paris. We see the Defarges in the wine shop and Mme. Defarge is always knitting, as …
    Back to St. Antoine to p. 188
    Okay, back to Paris. We see the Defarges in the wine shop and Mme. Defarge is always knitting, as usual. In comes the Mender of Roads (a puzzle piece from before). Did you notice him in the past? He was in the section below called Monseigneur in town and country. He was the one who saw Gaspard, the father of the child the Marquis killed with his carriage, crouching on the carriage. What did Gaspard do to avenge his child's death?

    Ever since that day, Gaspard had been in hiding, but alas he is found. The Mender of Roads is brought to Saint Antoine, the poor neighborhood where the Defarges live, to tell about Gaspard's punishment. It is not good. It is vindictive and cruel and hurts not only Gaspard but the whole village.

    We see the Defarges receive this news with grim faces and Mme. Defarge knits something new into her knitting. We know now what she is knitting. It's a list. The Marquis's name has now been knitted in, condemned to the last person of his race.

    shroud: a burial cloth. When someone asks Mme. Defarge what she is knitting, she says she is knitting shrouds. Why is this true?

    Dickens often personifies Saint Antoine. It's a neighborhood, a poor section of Paris, but he talks about it as if it's a person.

    Then someone shows up who we met earlier in the novel. John Barsad has a new job: he is now a XXXXX. Puzzle pieces fit together. He goes to the wine shop but nobody comes into it. Mme. Defarge has a rose that she has pinned into her headscarf. Does the rose have anything to do with the fact that nobody comes into the wine shop while John Barsad is there?

    What is the latest name to be knitted?
    11:43 am
  2. msg ReaderMania to p. 165 message posted ReaderMania to p. 165 You knew “hooroar” was “hooray.” You remembered that Roger Cly was one of the two witnesses for …
    ReaderMania to p. 165
    You knew “hooroar” was “hooray.”

    You remembered that Roger Cly was one of the two witnesses for the prosecution against Darnay. Who was the other?

    You know that you don’t fish in graveyards in the middle of the night with shovels.

    You know that at this time, it was illegal to dissect cadavers and if surgeons wanted to practice, they had to pay for bodies under the table.

    You knew that the coffin that was following Jerry was of his imagination, a figment of his terror.

    You enjoyed the description of that mean, chasing coffin, like a cartoon of evil.

    You know what a Resurrection Man is.

    7 possible points.
    9:32 am
  3. msg Jerry and mysterious doings to p. 165 message posted Jerry and mysterious doings to p. 165 What could “hooroar” possibly mean? And why does Jerry Cruncher Sr. hit Jerry Cruncher Jr. when th…
    Jerry and mysterious doings to p. 165
    What could “hooroar” possibly mean? And why does Jerry Cruncher Sr. hit Jerry Cruncher Jr. when the young one says it in reference to a funeral procession?

    It turns out the funeral is for Roger Cly, an Old Bailey spy, according to the crowd. Now where have we heard that name before? This is when a new puzzle piece fits with an old one.

    Jerry Sr. observes to himself that when he last saw Roger Cly, he was young and straight made. Then Jerry Sr. stops by at a surgeon’s office on his way back to work. All rather puzzling, yes? Jerry calls himself an honest tradesman and says he plans to go fishing at night. Fishing at night?! He takes with him some curious fishing tackle: a sack, a crowbar, a rope and chain. He goes out of the house and his son, young Jerry, follows, sneaking unobserved along behind him. Jerry Jr. sees another man silently and mysteriously join his dad, and then another, and the 3 men go on together in the dark. They come to a churchyard. They begin to “fish”—but no water and no fishing poles. Just digging and auguring and hoisting of something out of the ground. Oh, so scary to the boy! When he sees what they have, he runs away at top speed, imagining that he is being chased by something terrifying. What is it that he imagines chasing him? Look on page 163 in the middle for a fabulous description, an example of Dickens’s art. Remember what I told you about Bill Sykes seeing the body of Nancy following him everywhere?

    When young Jerry gets home and goes to sleep, he is awakened by his father in a foul mood, beating his mother (this is not meant to be taken as seriously as we now view such abuse. This is sort of like cartoon violence), for his “fishing” has evidently gone badly wrong. There is no fish for breakfast, that’s for sure. Mrs. Cruncher says something about “the dreadful business” that her husband undertakes.

    And the chapter ends with the concept of the Resurrection Man, who deals in a “branch of Scientific goods.” Young Jerry confides in his father that he would like to be a Resurrection Man when he grows up. This makes his father very proud.

    What is a Resurrection Man?
    9:27 am

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